21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari

21Lessons

I chose this book to end my weekend of cleansing my palate and solely reading Non-Fiction.  This is not a review of an Indie Author.  However I have read the other two books by this author and while I did not love them, I did learn from them and they led to several wonderful conversations with other readers.  I was hoping for that with this one too.

Unfortunately I do not see that happening. I felt as if this was much more opinion based than a provider of information. Subjects are touched on lightly and solely from the point of view of the author. There is also many references to his other works and the responses they received. I understand that this book was created because of unanswered questions from the first two books but do not think those questions were answered in this book.

Maybe I am missing something.  A lot of reviewers have already read and reviewed this book and they think it is absolutely wonderful. Maybe I just read too many cool non-fiction books right before this one – OR may it just is not my cup of tea.

I received the ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) of this book from the publisher via NetGalley.

If you loved his other books give this book a try after it is published on September 4, 2018.

SUMMARY

In Sapiens, he explored our past. In Homo Deus, he looked to our futureNow, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of today’s most pressing issues.

How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children?

Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.

In twenty-one accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?

Harari’s unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is essential reading.

3 thoughts on “21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari

  1. You started out with an objective report. True, his writing is opinion based, flying off to fantasy even in Sapiens, which claimed to be based on history. Then why was it that you continued with a raves in the so-called summary? I got the feeling that this was an advertisement in the dress of a book review.

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    • I did not write the summary. The summary is provided by the publisher/author of the book and is what usually appears on a sales link or the back of the book. I provide it merely as information since I do not summarize in my reviews.

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